contact details:
eileen.g.perrier@gmail.com

+44(0)7930 282 610




© Eileen Perrier | Mobile Portrait |WeAreW12| Commissioned by The Bush Theatre | 2016
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Eileen Perrier
Born: 1974 (London)
Lives and works in London.

A graduate of The Royal College of Art, Eileen Perrier’s work has been widely exhibited since 1999, including The Photographers' Gallery, (London, UK); Tate Britain (London, UK); The Whitechapel Gallery (London, UK), the touring exhibition Africa Remix, which included the Hayward Gallery (London) and The Centre Pompidou (Paris, France).

Perrier has also been artist in residence at Light Work (in partnership with Autograph ABP) (New York, USA); in Playing The City, Kunsthalle Schirn (Frankfurt, Germany) and has worked with Tate Britain (as an invited artist) on their education programme - BP Family Festival: Close Encounters of the Art Kind and currently has work installed from a portrait commission with Kings College London called "Portraits of a Global Law School" currently displayed on level -1 in Somerset House East Wing.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
News: Please see entries below.
-----------------------------------------------
12 Oct 2016 | Photography

WeAreW12 is a free photography exhibition and a celebration of Shepherd’s Bush, created by photographer Eileen Perrier and the people of Shepherd’s Bush.

EILEEN INTRODUCES WEAREW12.

I have been taking portraits of strangers with my mobile phone since 2012, initially as a visual diary of my surroundings and now as a spontaneous alternative for taking portraits of strangers in situ. In some respects it reminds me of the point and shoot disposable camera aesthetic and in my early days working as a street photographer.

When I was commissioned by the Bush Theatre for the WeAreW12 exhibition focusing on the Uxbridge Road, Artistic Director Madani Younis explained it is one of the most diverse roads in Europe and I was compelled to capture the essence of this statement.

The inhabitants are eclectic and, on the whole, warm and friendly. Some would give me a snippet of information such as the Mormons on their first day out together; the lady fixing her makeup – an actress currently in Motown The Musical; the expectant mother, due the following Friday, who looked so amazing; the gentleman in the laundrette who shared an in-depth conversation about his family history; the man reciting poetry to his possible love interest, or maybe they were just friends…

These subjects were proud to be part of a community project run by the Bush Theatre. It’s clearly held with great admiration which is why I was able to capture more than 50 people in three days. Most extraordinary really.

To focus this ongoing mobile phone portrait project in Shepherd’s Bush and relating back to the plays commissioned about the area for This Place We Know has enabled me to gain a sense of place both through the eyes of the writers and of the community.

WeAreW12 is displayed on the Bush Theatre building on Uxbridge Road throughout Winter 2016. It is free to view. Share your photos with us of faces and places in Shepherd’s Bush using #WeAreW12.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Other exhibitions:

MEAD GALLERY
The Human Document
The Photography of Persuasion from 1930s America to Present Day
Fri 7 Oct – Sat 10 Dec 2016 / Open Mon – Sat 12pm – 9pm
Venue: Mead Gallery
Tickets: FREE

The Human Document explores artists’ enduring fascination with the work of a group of photographers commissioned by the Farm Security Administration Programme (FSA) in Depression era-America to document the plight of rural workers and to introduce ‘America to Americans’.

The exhibition includes images produced during the years 1935-1944 by photographers including Dorothea Lange and Walker Evans. It also includes photographic work produced from the 1970s onwards following a revival of interest in the FSA photography programme. This includes the work of Chris Killip and Paul Graham, made during the British recession of the 1970s and ‘80s and Richard Billingham’s famously shocking photographs of his own family in the mid-1990s series, Ray’s a Laugh.

In Grapevine (1988-1992), the American photographer Susan Lipper presents an intimate series of images made in a small West Virginian town of the same name. Eileen Perrier’s Mobile Portraits – produced using an iPhone – demonstrates the extent to which both the nature of photography and the relationship between photographer and subject has changed since the 1930s with the advent of digital technologies and the democratising effects of social media.

www.warwickartscentre.co.uk/whats-on/2016/the-human-document/

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Portraits of a Global Law School

‘Portraits of a Global Law School’ brought together over 50 alumni, students and members of staff to have their photographs taken at The Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College London.

A selection of the portraits have also been installed in the East Wing of Somerset House, alongside a specially curated series of images and texts related to the exhibition.

Everyone who took part in the project was also interviewed, by Kieran Mcgrath. Using these conversations, brief texts were written to accompany the portraits, describing each featured person’s relationship to the School. This combination of portraiture and narrative is designed to articulate the complex diversity that constitutes the School’s global community.

One major theme that quickly became apparent, even in the project’s early stages, was how the School’s progressive sense of inclusivity has allowed students to thrive. This was as true for those who studied here in the 1950s as it was for those who have only recently arrived, irrespective of whether they were born in the United Kingdom, or in places as diverse as Nigeria, Colombia, Hong Kong or Iraq.

In celebrating the achievements of our alumni, students and staff from a diverse array of backgrounds, the School is working in support of the university’s Race Equality Charter Mark. Creating a space for an open dialogue between the School and its wider community is central to tackling prejudice and perceived barriers. The project functions, not just as an opportunity for individuals to tell their personal stories, but also for an understanding of the School’s collective identity that goes beyond superficial categories of gender, race and ability.

Portraits of a Global Law School is displayed on level -1 in Somerset House East Wing.

www.kcl.ac.uk/law/about/vis-arts/global-portraits.aspx






---------------------------------------------------------------------------------